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and russian foreign ministers met with the u.n. envoy on syria and hillary clinton said events on the ground in syria are accelerating. she also joined the u.s. defense secretary in expressing concern that damascus is considering using chemical weapons against the rebels. >> i think there is no question that we remain very concerned, very concerned. as the opposition advances, in particular on damascus, the regime might very well consider the use of chemical weapons. >> secretary panetta went on to say that the white house made it clear there will be consequences should the assad regime make the mistake of using those weapons on its own people. for more on the perspective from damascus, i spoke a short time ago to the bbc's jeremy bolon -- jeremy bowen. >> the issue has been pretty firm on the use of chemical weapons. any news from damascus? >> i think the regime here can feel the pressure. it has been under huge pressure in the last couple of weeks, increasing pressure. of the most pressure has faced from the west, certainly, in the almost two years this has been going on. i spoke before pa
with the u.n. envoy on syria and hillary clinton said events on the ground in syria are accelerating. she also joined the u.s. defense secretary in expressing concern that damascus is considering using chemical weapons against the rebels. >> i think there is no question that we remain very concerned, very concerned. as the opposition advances, in particular on damascus, the regime might very well consider the use of chemical weapons. >> secretary panetta went on to say that the white house made it clear there will be consequences should the assad regime make the mistake of using those weapons on its own people. for more on the perspective from damascus, i spoke a short time ago to the bbc's jeremy bolon -- jeremy bowen. >> the issue has been pretty firm on the use of chemical weapons. any news from damascus? >> i think the regime here can feel the pressure. it has been under huge pressure in the last couple of weeks, increasing pressure. of the most pressure has faced from the west, certainly, in the almost two years this has been going on. i spoke before panetta made his remarks to the i
. but my guest is worried that the u.n. is focusing on this when this is going on. what is going on here? >>guest: well, the u.n. is acting less and less like a bull washington against war, the real purpose and more and more as a mechanism to redistribute wealth and power, away from free societies and toward dictatorships. >>neil: maybe they are hanging their hat on this possibility of russia playing a role in getting assad to step down but that at best is wish will thinking, i think, and hanging your hopes on not having a backbone if you can get a back door deal with the guy who is kill all the people. >> russia has been supplying the assad regime with weapons. russia is one of the worst players in the middle east. in fact, it is very hard to come up with anything positive. russia has contributed to the middle east in living memory. i can't think of anything. >>neil: the united nations will do what? they get involved in all these other ridiculous time consuming wasteful enterprises and this is fat more immediate crisis. >>guest: what is going on is something we really should be asking,
precautions to protect the ambassador. jon: u.n. ambassador susan rice has been under fire for weeks for her public response to the attack. the ambassador calling it spontaneous and not linking it to terrorism in and several television interviews. however, dianne feinstein is coming to the ambassador's defense, saying that the talking points she was given were wrong. >> i do not believe the intelligence communities should prepare these talking points. i think additionally somebody should have picked up the phone and called and said, tell me the story, what happened. jon: congressman rogers is not convinced. he suggests that someone in the obama administration simply try to change the story. >> it really is beyond the talking points and susan rice. it was a political narrative designed not around what the intelligence said, but what about the best politics were for them. jon: joining us now to help break this down is bret baier. the interesting thing in one of those sound like i'm jim -- the interesting thing in one of those sound bites is what she should have talked about on morning televisi
that has tossed a country into chaos. team fox coverage continues now. jonathan hunt at the u.n. jonathan, this looks like the beginning of an end game to many. >> yeah. it certainly does. the rebels have clearly taken the decision within the past week that they cannot bring about the downfall of the assad regime without taking the battle directly to the capital damascus. they do not, however, yet have the fire power to win in one big final assault. so this is likely to be a war of attrition within damascus itself and president assad has gathered his hot best trained troops around his strong holds within the capital so this may well go on for days. butng to a lot of experts, the pressure on president assad is growing day by day. and that is why there is the concern about the use of these chemical weapons because they say in many ways now, president assad is like a cornered rat. shep? >> shepard: jonathan, still so many questions about what happens after assad. >> yeah, and that's one of the problems here for the international community. we have heard again and again just how many factions
in the u.n. a country. the legal ramifications for israel are not significant. and a month ago, a woman dies after doctors refused to perform her abortion. the woman's husband makes a major announcement today. let's go "outfront." we have breaking news. new details on the fiscal cliff deal that timothy geithner put on the table today during his meeting with congressional leaders on the hill. these details just coming in. jessica yellin has that and what have you learned about what geithner took you know, listed out with the numbers and put on the table? >> hey, erin, here are some of the details i'm getting from senior officials on both sides. the headline is that he put out a number of $1.6 trillion in new taxes. that was at according to republican officials, a surprise. they expected a much smaller number and that has some republicans crying foul. he proposes extending unemployment insurance. continuing the dock fix. that's approving additional spending on medicare to pay doctors. the amt patch protecting middle income americans. $50 billion in stimulus next year and in return, the ad
. they want the u.n. to take over the thing in a matter of speaking. >>shepard: a republican senator is upping the ante on nominations of susan rice over benghazi. ambassador rice said the attack was the result of a respond tablous mob and officials say it was a terror attack and has insisted she was reading, repeating official talking points and the final version came from intelligence agencies and not the white house. that 'it were the intelligence community is now backing her. but susan collins is not accepting that claiming she was well aware this was a lot more to those talking points. and now the news from washington. catherine? >>reporter: since the closed classified briefings on capitol hill lawmakers say they shad access to unclassified access on the c.i.a. talking points and classified information and now a leading republican in the senate tells fox the classified information including a daily brief of the president containing the most highly classified intelligence and in this case included evidence of al qaeda involvement in the benghazi attack. here is senator collins speaking to
second story out front, victory for palestinians. the u.n. general assembly voted in favor of palestinian state hood. we want to show you the wild celebrations going on right now. this is the west bank. after the u.n. overwhelmingly gave the palestinians something they have wanted for years and the vote was pretty overwhelming. 138 countries in favor. it was a shellacking for those against it. the resolution passed against the will of the united states, israel, canada and six other nations. here's u.n. ambassador susan rice after the vote. >> today's unfortunate and counterproductive resolution places further obstacles in the path to peace. that is why the united states voted against it. >> now, the vote gives the palestinians a higher profile at the u.n. and more important, it also means they can join organizations like the international criminal court. that is important because it could allow the palestinians to pursue war crime charges against israel. "outfront" tonight, the prime minister. good to see you again. so what does this vote mean for israel? >> it doesn't mean anything. i th
? election coming up? what happened in the u.n.? what's the feeling there? >> well, certainly the israelis have made no secret of the fact that this is a direct punitive measure for what happened at the u.n. last thursday where, of course, the palestinians managed get an upgraded status there in the u.n. general assembly going to nonmember observer state. of course, the word state there is the operative one for the palestinians. the palestinians now say they do, in fact, have a state which is a taertory that is defined as the west bank, gaza, and east jerusalem. so, therefore, the palestinians are saying that this obviously would make the implementation of this state all but impossible because they say it would be impossible for them to even reach their capital that they want to have, which is, of course, east jerusalem. this is certainly a measure that's cause aing lot of international controversy. you were saying that great britain and france have already put out staunch statements aimed at the israelis. the israelis are saying, yes, all these countries have voiced their concern. they're
thoughts on this convention. i -- it seems as if most of the 250eu78times when the u.n. treas come up, i have been opposed to them. my concern has always been that of sovereign at this moment so. i do oppose the crpd because i think does impinge upon our sovereignty, establishing an unelected united nations body called the committee on the rights of persons with disabilities in the conference of state parties. these unelected bureaucratic bodies would implement the treaty and pass so-called recommendations that would be -- that would be forced upon the united nations and the u.s. as if the u.s. senior senator a signatory. we already have the 190 act. we went through that a few years ago. i was here at that time. it is considered to be the gold standard for the disabled. we don't need the united nations bureaucrats changing it in our country in the name of worldwide application. while the obama administration afirst that no changes to -- affirms that no changes to the federal or state law will be necessary, if the crpd is ratified, the crpd can be amended. the senator from indiana talked
observer status at the u.n. the palestinian delegation unfurled its flag right there on the floor of the general assembly. the u.s., israel, and allies oppose the vote saying it was all premature. >>> the american soldier accused of leaking a trove of classified documents to wikileaks will be questioned in a military court again today. private first-class bradley manning took the stand in a pretrial hearing yesterday making his first public statement since his arrest two years ago. manning wants his case thrown out, claiming he suffered unlawful punishment during his first year in detention. >>> there are reports of a settlement in a sex scandal that made international headlines. no details yet on the agreement between former international monetary fund chief dominique strauss-kahn. you guys probably remember this story. as well as the new york city hotel maid who had accused him of sexual akault. prosecutors have dropped criminal charges against strauss-kahn, but the incident ended his political career as well as his marriage. you remember once that woman came forward and gave th
-to-face negotiations will lead to a lasting peace. meantime just after the u.n. vote, israel approved construction of new housing in the west bank in ears jerusalem. palestinian leaders said that would not return to the peace talks unless and until israel freezes that construction and it doesn't appear it's happening. they also say they want to return to the pre1967 borders whereby israel would give back the west bank east jerusalem and gaza. back to the early days of the internet. nobody knew how big it would become. obviously. and that's why representatives from around the world are getting together to rewrite the rules for the internet. this is fascinating and what they have in mind could change everything we know about the internet. we have in-depth report coming. plus, after losing the latino vote in a big way in the 2012 election. republicans are now pushing for new immigration plan in congress. it is not going over well with everybody as you might imagine. that's next. you know how painful heartburn can be. for fast, long lasting relief, use doctor recommended gaviscon®. only gaviscon® fo
been contaminated. >> reporter: experts believe cholera was brought here by u.n. peacekeepers. untreated sewage from this base flowed into a tributary of the river, the major source of water for both washing and drinking. cholera is spread by fecal-oral contact. two years on 200,000 patients have been sickened, 750 d 7,500 have died from diarrhea and fluid loss. each flood brings more contaminated water, more cases. the epidemic prompted massive relief efforts and public campaigns. on the streets and in classrooms promoting hygiene and sanitation. fatalities have dropped from 10% of cases early on to about 1%. still, 600 people have died from cholera this year. many in remote areas even those unaffected by floods. there's now plenty of awareness of cholera in haiti. the biggest challenge for people today is distance. as the epidemic subsided over the last few months many treatment centers have been closed in the remote areas. getting to plays that remain open is a huge challenge that can take hours. and that delay can be fatal. this man, a 27-year-old mother of three, will lik
heard all this talk about, well, home schoolers, people -- home schooling their kids, that the u.n. was going to come in and take them away. nonshens --, nonsense, utter, sheer nonsense. and so what happened today was the triumph on the senate floor of fear. unfounded, unreasonable fear triumphed over experience, the experience we've had with the americans with disabilities act, reason, rational thought. unfounded fears that somehow, someplace, somebody's going to do something out of the u.n., they're going to come in and take over something. but we proved, proved beyond any shadow of a doubt that none of our laws had to be changed, this gave the u.n. no authority over our country or our laws or anything, and yet this unfounded fear took hold. to the point where people who were sponsors of the bill voted against it. sponsors of it now just turned around and voted against it. again, for what reason, unfounded fear. what message, what message did we send today to the rest of the world? a message that okay, we're pretty good, we did a lot of good stuff in terms of passing legislation
, the foreign policy team. >> we saw this joking moment, let me replay it, a news conference to push the u.n. treaty on disabilities which -- >> which is going to -- may fail. >> which is unbelievable since america has been -- >> very surprising. >> way out front since the days of bush '41 and tom harken was the big -- >> bob dole. >> and john mccain today made a plea for bob dole who is in walter reed he wants to see this great moment, a worldwide standard, it would be good for business, but as you pointed out on the daily rundown today, the chamber of commerce supports this, selling wheelchairs -- >> around the world. >> and here, it's stalemate. it needs two-thirds, more than 60. this is a treaty. because it has u.n. attached to it -- >> going to say it's brand, it's about brand. >> at that moment with mccain and john kerry because of foreign relations issue and this is the way mccain sort of gigged john kerry and kerry teased him back. >> thank you very much, mr. secretary. >> thank you very much, mr. president. >> and there was a lot of joking after that. a lot of laughing. >> we should
. >> reporter: russia and china have repeatedly vetoed u.n. security council resolutions on imposing sanctions against syria. without their support, the international efforts can only put limited pressure on president assad. diplomats here are still hoping their efforts will help in some part to end the conflict in syria. however, after 20 months of violence, they've learned getting peace will take time. akira saheki, nhk world, tokyo. >>> satellite images show north korea could be preparing to launch another rocket. researchers at johns hopkins university in the united states say they have observed the first two stages of what appears to be a long-range missile. these images of the launch site in tongchang-ri on the west coast of north korea were captured on monday. researchers say they show trailers carrying the first two stages of a three-stage rocket. they say north korean officials seem to be conducting final checks. the orientation of a crane on the site was also different from three days earlier. equipment that could be used to record the launch, including cameras and antennas, was also
have repeatedly vetoed u.n. security council resolutions on imposing sanctions against syria. without their support, the international efforts can only put limited pressure on president assad. diplomats here are still hoping their efforts will help in some part to end the conflict in syria. however, after 20 months of violence, they've learned getting peace will take time. akira saheki, nhk world, tokyo. >>> satellite images show north korea could be preparing to launch another rocket. researchers at johns hopkins university in the united states say they have observed the first two stages of what appears to be a long-range missile. these images of the launch site in tongchang-ri on the west coast of north korea were captured on monday. researchers say they show trailers carrying the first two stages of a three-stage rocket. they say north korean officials seem to be conducting final checks. the orientation of a crane on the site was also different from three days earlier. equipment that could be used to record the launch, including cameras and antennas, was also observed on the site.
at this u.n. conference. delegates in to seal an intern -- delegates came to seal an interim pact. >> environmental groups holding a silent protest at the conference. after a week of talks, there has been little progress. the kyoto protocol expires at the end of the year. the question now is whether or not it will be extended and which countries sign up. another issue is how much more money developing countries should get to help them deal with the effects of climate change. in the coming days, it will be up to environment ministers to thrash out these and other points. >> certain points can only be resolved by the ministers themselves. providing financial support to poorer countries, for example. how much are we willing to do by 2020 to protect the environment? >> scientists say climate change is happening much faster than previously thought. the evidence, such as spermatic pmelting of -- the dramatic melting of sea ice, is mounting. >> the eu is at its strongest when we had all 27 countries on board, supporting the same goal. we need to keep at it. >> officials are now making th
clinton agreed to meet with the russian foreign minister and rahim my, the u.n. ambassador for the syrian issue and the syrian dossier. if the regime uses chemical weapons or any weapons of mass destruction, the regime in syria, that is definitely an indication that it is a last act of desperation. melissa: yeah. >> i'm sure that the international community will try to prevent that in any way, shape or form. the syrian, the russian president, putin, a couple of days ago when he was in turkey, he gave some signals that the chem cap -- chemical weapons in syria are secure. we need to sit down with the russians to see if they have any guaranties to the security of these weapons. >>you talked about how the international community could do to prevent it. there are weapons weapons and there is money. what could we do at this point to try to stop this from happening? >> well i think, you know, the regime of syria has these weapons and i'm not sure they're going to sell them or if we put money on the table that will solve this. melissa: no. but is there aid to another country, aid to egypt, to ru
: a shocking real-life health crisis involving a former child star, why frankie m u.n. iz was rushed to the hospital. we are live at the breaking news desk. the new nears about chemical weapons in the civil war rocking syria, why the u.s. and the international community should be concerned. we'll go in-depth with ambassador bolton. jenna: right now we are learning about a serious health problem for a former child star, rick folbaum is live at the breaking news news desk with more. >> reporter: you don't usually hear about healthy 20 somethings having strokes. that's what doctors say happened to frankly m u.n. is. he was riding his motorcycle in phoenix when he lost vision in one eye. friends, including his fiancee got worried when he was acting very strangely. turns out he was having a mini stroke. here he is on "good morning america." >> something wasn't right. i knew i did not feel right. coy -pbt say words. couldn't say words. i thought i was saying them. my fiancee was looking at me like i was speaking a foreign language. maybe i had a bad headache, i don't know. i've never had a
? >> reporter: norah, it's a sign of a possible diplomatic breakthrough. u.n. envoy to syria is flying here to dublin for this last-minute meeting with secretary of state hillary clinton and the russian foreign minister. it may signal that russia is finally willing to take u.n. action to send a message to bashar al assad to stop the killing. russia one of syria's few remaining allies and so far have agreed to any interactions to stop the killing of thousands of people. >> charlie rose here. the reporting that they're mixing the ingredients for chemical weapons influence what the russians may be doing? >> reporter: the russian foreign minister says that the outside russian government -- syrian government assures them that they are rumors. russia wants to be part of what comes next. if clinton can get russia to support at the u.n. security council, they could have sanctions that would cut seary off from any outside support. >> where does the violence stand? >> reporter: charlie we're told that rebels surround the city of damascus which has been an as assad stronghold.
. the senate has managed to vote on something, rejected a u.n. treaty to extend rights to the blind and disabled, rights that have been the law of the land here in the united states since 1990. despite an emotional appearance from bob dole just out of walter reed, 89 years old, a passionate advocate for equal rights for the disabled since his first speech on the senate floor in 1969. joining me for our daily fix, kra, managing editor of post politics.com and capitol hill correspondents, nbc's kelly o'donnell and luke russert. kelly, to you, because this vote in the senate, john kerry led the way, it was bipartisan, in support. they needed 6 votes. it's a treaty, two-thirds of the senate and it failed. talk to me about all the ramifications here. >> it's not that often andrea, you know this, when votes on the senate floor can draw such powerful emotions and even tears from members of the gallery who attend in the public seats that are not in camera view. but we had that today. there was strong, passionate feelings about this for those in support of the treaty, which essentially as th
of the dictator kim jung un. >> this is against the u.n. security council resolutions and we are monitoring the situation closely. and working very closely with the self-defense force and the ministry of defense. this is a dangerous situation. and we do not support those actions right now by north korea. bill: steven yates, sir, good morning and welcome back here to america's newsroom. it's been some time since we talked about this issue. now it's back and on the plate. >> any time you are dealing with long range missile capability it will be a concern. we have thousands of troops stationed in japan and korea. there is talk of being able to reach los angeles or the western coast. no north korean test so far has reached that near abroad. bill: what would korea want to prove with this launch? >> always dangerous to try to climb into the mind of a north korean leader. but there would have to be a domestic component to the situation. there are important elections taking place in japan on the 16th and south korea on the 19th of this month. well within the range of this test that is scheduled to
is holding an unscheduled meeting in ireland with russia's foreign minister and the u.n. special envoy to syria. a sign russia may be switching sides to put pressure on syria to stop the fighting. in dublin covering talks, margaret, good morning. do you think this is a sign of a diplomatic breakthrough? >> reporter: norah, the sign of a possible diplomatic breakthrough. flying here to dublin for a last-minute meeting with secretary of state hillary clinton and the russian foreign minister. it may signal that russia is finally willing to take u.n. action to send a message to bashar al assad to stop the killing. one of april saud's few remaining allies and so faro posed action to intervene the crisis that killed nearly 40,000 people. >> margaret, charlie rose here. has the report that david martin has, the story that david martin has reported that they're mixing the ingredients of chemical weapons influenced what the russians may be doing? >> reporter: well, the russian foreign minister said that the assad government assures them that the reports that syria is readying chemical weapons a
point of negotiations, the appearance was that the u.n. secretary general, the u.s. secretary of state, the president of egypt and a few more foreign ministers all came in a way to save hamas and the islamic jihad. now, this is rather strange that two terrorist organizations which are involved almost endlessly in killing innocent people which are exercising the most authoritarian regime in gaza are protected by these countries. but that was the result of the way in which the whole thing was handled and i'm not sure that is helpful toward the future. >> rose: let me go back in the past. what exactly did you and mr. abbas negotiate and why did it not hold? >> well, that's a good question. first of all, it didn't hold because at the very end when we were a very, very, very close to conclude an agreement between israel and the palestinians which have -- would have resolve it had historical conflict between the two sides and would have created two states, palestinian state, you recognize boundaries and, of course, the state of israel is the home of the jewish people. in recognized bound rei
flew to dublin to hold a meeting with her russian counter part and u.n. enjoy to syria meeting to discuss how they would end the now 21-month long conflict in syria and how to move assad from power. and there's no sign they had to reverse the support, and today, a senior lawmaker says the syria government is now incapable of functioning properly. just before the meeting with the russian foreign minister, secretary clinton insisted that the united states and russia share common goals in the region. >> trying hard to work hard with russia to stop the bloodshed in syria and begin a political transition to a post asad future. the pressure against the regime in and around damascus seems to be increasing. lou: at home, leon pa net fa issuing the -- panetta issuing the sharpest warning yet. >> the president of the united states made it clear there will be consequences. there will be consequences if the assad regime makes a terrible mistake by using chemical weapons on their own people. lou: neither the white house or pentagon elaborating on what the cons -- consequences would be, but
violation of a u.n. security council resolution, and we encourage the leadership in north korea to consider what they are doing here and implications in the overall security environment on the korean peninsula, as well as destination. >> anything new? we been hearing some rumblings for some time that there might be some activity on that front. anything new that you can provide in terms of insights into launches or things like that? >> well, i think you're tracking a pretty well. i think from the media today there are indications declared indications of their intention to do what they would call a peaceful satellite launch. and we believe it is in contradictory to the u.n. security council resolutions, that because of the nature of the type of missile they will be firing and the implications it has for ballistic missile type of activity somewhere down the road, and the destabilizing impact that will have on security incitement throughout the throughout the region, not just on the peninsula. >> can you follow up on some of -- was short assessment? they say they have solve whatever problems th
republicans voted no. >> to vote for anything that is even perceived to be granting the u.n. power is a dangerous game for a republican senator because the u.n. is so unpopular among the republican base. >> oh, my god. it's official. republicans hate the united nations more than they like helping people in wheelchairs. >> with us now from washington, nbc news chief white house correspondent and political director and host of "the daily rundown," chuck todd. with us here on the set, writer for "the national review" online, bob costa. robert, thank you so much for being with us today. >> good to join you. >> hey, chuck, so we're having a debate here. yesterday we had matt lewis, well-known conservative, guy that we really like, saying that john boehner was weaker than ever. "the new york times" today, not as well beloved in conservative circles, how boehner gained strong backing from the house gop. a lot of really good sources in there. what's your take on boehner's positioning right now? where does he stand compared to last year when he always felt like eric cantor was breathing dow
conference in ireland. the special u.n. envoy to syria was at the meeting said they agreed to seek a, quote, creative solution to the syrian crisis. jim miklaszewski joins us with the latest. let's talk about the information that nbc reported regarding the syrian military and its actions right now. >> to be clear the precursor of chemicals or at least a couple that actually when combined chemically create that deadly nerve gas. we've been told by u.s. sources those precursor chemicals have been preloaded now into aerial bombs that could be dropped from the fighter bombers onto the syrian people. as of this afternoon there is still no indication that the syrians have actually put -- attempted to put those weapons on aircraft or that there's been a final fatal order from president assad to carry out any kind of attack. so it appears right now that they are in at least the preparation mode, but they're really just one step away from actually carrying out those chemical weapons attacks. we heard secretary panetta say today that the latest intelligence on what's going on with those chemical weap
minister sergei lavrov and u.n. envoy lakdar brahimi who spoke to the press. >> we haven't taken any sensational decisions but i think we have agreed that the situation is bad and we have agreed that we must continue to work together to see how we can find creative ways of bringing this problem under control and hopefully starting to solve it. >> brown: all of this, amid rising fears that the syrian president might use chemical weapons against the rebels. in washington, defense secretary leon panetta joined a chorus of u.s. warnings. >> the intelligence that we have raises serious concerns that this is being considered. >> reporter: those concerns were echoed on capitol hill. >> if syrian tv is catching this news conference, there's been a tidal shift here to where military force will be used to prevent those chemical weapons from ever seeing the light of day. >> brown: but syria's deputy foreign minister, speaking on lebanese t.v., charged that if anyone is planning to use chemical warfare, it's the west. >> ( translated ): we have strong fear of the existence of a conspiracy to use
this time around. several nations and the u.n. secretary general have repeatedly warned that this is a potential threat and repeatedly warn president assad not to go through it here. >> shepard: there is another thought and dangerous one that assad is just playing a game. >> the idea that he is finally completely desperate. is he realizing finally that he is now surrounded by the rebels in damascus. they are getting closer and closer to it ousting him. that ouster, if he stays there, would end in his death. so, this might be a final negotiating employee on the -- ploy on the part of president assad with the international community. listen. >> another way to look at it though, he wants russia and others to notice he is taking this potentially suicidal step in the hopes of one last diplomatic solution that so far he has been against. but he may now sees a his only hope. so maybe if russia is persuaded that assad is on the doorstep of defeat or suicide for that matter, effective suicide, that russia will finally help us do a deal to get a power sharing arrangement. >> so a
be a sign that russia might now be ready to shift its position and support stronger u.n. action against syria. molly henneberg is live at the pentagon keeping an eye on all of these developments. why is russia so important here, molly. >> reporter: russia is one of syria's allies, in fact one of sear kwras onl syria as only allies. and that is why it is thought they may have some sway over syria and bashar al-assad. hillary clinton is in a meeting this afternoon at a security conference in dublin, ireland. they will be meeting today specifically on syria. at the same time the secretary general of the united nations says he also is pressing syria not to use chemical weapons. >> i'm just very much concerned, and i have warned that in any case if chemical weapons is used then they will have to be put to justice and create serious consequences to those people. >> reporter: if president bashar al-assad were to leave the country it would create an immediate problem with who would take over and a secondary problem of who would control the chemical weapons. jon. jon: it is one thing to load ser
will be meeting with her russian counterpart and that u.n. envoy talking about syria. the u.s. and russia have been on opposite sides of that conflict in sirah -- conflict in syria. however today's meeting is suggesting a possible compromising. all of this comes as fox news reports, the syrian military is mixing deadly chemical weapons. the syrian government has not confirmed they have these weapons, saying only it could not use -- it would not use that type of weapon against its people. president obama has warned of serious consequences if the syrian government uses those chemicals in that civil war. >>> allegations of spying on the high seas. the america's cup controversy involving the oracle racing team. >>> and we're looking live outside of traffic. that's the bay bridge toll plaza. tara is coming back, one more commute look. >>> in about 30 minutes a hearing will get underway in san francisco to determine the fate of a pit -- pit bull that attacked a u.s. park patrol officer's horse. the horse named stony was bitten by a pit bull named charlie at crissy field back in august. animal offici
of mali, to our allies, and to our security. the u.n. security council is now considering what they call a concept of operations for an african-led military operation. the u.s. can and should play a more active role in supporting this and preventing the country from becoming a permanent home for extremists and a safe haven for terrorists. an active role, mr. president, does not mean putting american boots on the ground. instead, we can provide operational support for a regionally led, multilateral, african-led force being organized by eco was, the economic community of west african states, and the african union. in the weeks ahead, the u.n. security council will likely vote on a resolution authorizing this coalition to lead a military intervention to dislodge the terrorists in the northern. we've seen models like this wo work, in cote d'ivoire and somalia, so there's reason to believe in the potential of a regional military solution to the security crisis in the north. however, even if this intervention works, it will take time to train and equip and assemble the regional force and to de
made it very clear at the u.n. general assembly where the israeli red line is. but there is an argument that there is no american red line, there is an american invisible line, and no one is sure where it is. not the iranians, not us, not the israelis. do you share that concern? is there anything we can do to establish a more conclusive and defined redline so that it helps us in our negotiating strategy with the iranians? as we were reminded this morning, persians negotiate in the bazaar. do we have an america that we can more clearly defined -- american red line that we can more clearly define? >> there are a couple of reasons by the military threat is important. as sandy indicated, the iranians to respond to credible threats of force. -- do respond to credible threats of force. if you read the biographies of the hostage-takers, they said they were afraid ronald reagan was going to act like a cowboy. the release the hostages the minute he was sworn in. the soviets threatened to bomb tehran, and the hostages were let go. it is important to note that the iran-iraq war came to win and win
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